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Nant y Coed Local Nature Reserve


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A beautiful sheltered oak woodland nestled beneath the Carneddau mountain range. The impressive Afon Llanfairfechan roars loudly when in full flow.
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Why visit?

  • Beautiful ancient woodland
  • Riverside walk
  • Peaceful wildlife pond

A small ancient woodland at the top of Llanfairfechan surrounding the Afon Ddu. The footpath is steep and uneven in places with two sets of steps, giving you views of the trees from ground level and within the canopy.

The wildlife pond is the perfect place to pack a picnic and come and enjoy some fairy-tale-like scenery.  When the sun is on the pond, it can be easy to see fish rising.  Darting over the water are numerous dragonflies and damselflies.

The stepping stones at the top of the reserve are closed and there is no through route. We are looking at solutions and funding options for this issue.

Be careful around water – read the Waterside code.

Haven for wildlife

Spring is the perfect time to visit to enjoy the pretty native bluebells and other ancient woodland indicator plant species.  Bluebells and wood anemone grow well beneath the hazel and ash on the first wooded bank you come to from the Newry Drive entrance. 

If up very early, you are treated to a splendid dawn chorus. 

By early summer, the sessile oak trees are in full leaf and viewing the birds isn’t so easy. You may spot grey wagtails on the river and hear a buzzard soaring above.  You are treated to a blaze of purple as foxgloves grow densely on the riverside bank. A good nectar source for bumblebees, it’s fun to watch them wriggle about in the bell-shaped flowers.

Autumn is the best time to see the variety of fungi exploiting dead wood on the ground and standing tree stumps.

In autumn and winter you’ll see the river in full flow. The watercourse is still being forged.  The boulders moving along the bottom create a thunderous sound.

Recent history

Nant y Coed was once part of the Newry Estate, owned by Mr. Massey. It was developed for recreational purposes with the fish pond built around 1912.  This pond looks a lot less formal these days and is a haven for wildlife.

The estate was sold in 1923 and purchased by the then Urban District Council, now Conwy County Borough Council.

Autumn is the best time to see the variety of fungi exploiting dead wood on the ground and standing tree stumps.

In autumn and winter you’ll see the river in full flow. The watercourse is still being forged.  The boulders moving along the bottom create a thunderous sound.

Facilities

  • Timber decking and a bench by the wildlife pond.
  • Informal off road parking on Newry Drive (Grid Ref: SH69473 73968) or at the end of Valley Road (Grid Ref SH 6980 673586).
  • Shops, cafes and public toilets in the centre of the town

Dogs on leads are welcome – please use the dog bins provided.
Please be aware that there may be stray sheep about and the woodland is surrounded by farmland.

Please follow the Countryside Code when visiting our Local Nature Reserves.

Is the path and access into this woodland suitable for me?

The footpath in this woodland is only suitable on foot. It is uneven, rough and steep in places, with two sets of steps.

 

How to get here

Nant y Coed location map

Walking & Cycling

Nant y Coed is a 30 minute walk or 15 minute cycle from the centre of Llanfairfechan, following Valley Road up to Newry Drive.

Public Transport

The nearest bus stop is 30 minutes’ walk away by the traffic lights in Llanfairfechan (Nant Y Berllan stop).

Llanfairfechan railway station is a request stop. The site is a 35 minute walk from the station.

Driving

Along the A55 from Bangor, turn off for Llanfairfechan at junction 14. Turn right at the traffic lights onto Village Road, pass the shops then fork left onto Bryn Road, merging into Valley Road, then Newry Drive.

Along the A55 from Chester, turn off for Llanfairfechan at junction 15. Turn left at the traffic lights onto Village Road, pass the shops then fork left onto Bryn Road, merging into Valley Road, then Newry Drive.

The site entrance is on a sharp hairpin bend with an informal parking area. (Grid Ref SH 69474 73966)

What’s nearby

Farther afield up and above Nant y Coed – try the 4.5m circular ‘Llanfairfechan Upland Walk’.  Starts from the 3 Streams car park at the top of Valley Road. It’s a narrow lane!

Grid Ref: SH 6980 673586


Check rainfall, river levels and sea data via Natural Resources Wales’s website

If you fancy a longer day out around the village lanes then take a look at the ‘Llanfairfechan Walks’ leaflet which offers 4 route options, including Glan y MÔr Elias and Tyddyn Drycin reserves.

Llanfairfechan has a pretty promenade and shoreline. The popular Wales Coast Path covers this coastal stretch.

Threats to our ash woodlands

Ash dieback is a disease affecting ash trees within many of our broadleaved woodland nature reserves and parks.

Natural Resources Wales highlights current tree health issues.

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